Tag: commodity cycle

Gold: The Great Diversifier

Gold: The Great Diversifier

It’s no secret to you that I am still more bearish on gold than bullish. And it’s no secret to me that a lot of our subscribers still like gold and feel that it is still a safe haven and a good store of value long term. Despite having argued that gold was one of the largest bubbles […]

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Have Gold And Bitcoin Seen The Worst Of Their Bubble Bursts?

Have Gold And Bitcoin Seen The Worst Of Their Bubble Bursts?

You know I’ve been fighting the gold bugs for a long time. Gold is an inflation hedge, not a deflation hedge. Turn to gold for safety during a deflationary period and you’ll get your ass handed to you on a golden platter! Gold is simply another commodity and it burst in the 30-year cycle top between 2008 and 2011, […]

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Gold $5,000

Gold $5,000

No. I’m not flip-flopping! As I told subscribers to our Boom & Bust monthly newsletter in November, I stand by my forecast that gold must still lose about 65% of its current value before we hit the bottom of this latest commodity cycle, around 2020 or 2023. And when the markets unravel, as they must, gold will […]

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Predicting For Future Of Gold

Predicting For Future Of Gold

In an Unpredictable Market, the Future of Gold Remains Clear Even though the markets haven’t behaved logically of late, it would have seemed a slam dunk for gold to rise if Donald Trump won. After all, we faced uncertainty around his policies, rising inflation from infrastructure spending, and higher expected growth rates. But instead, gold […]

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The Commodity Cycle: What It Means For Precious Metals Prices

The Commodity Cycle: What It Means For Precious Metals Prices

The cycle for any commodity follows the same basic pattern… When prices are low, production falls. As new supplies diminish, the market tightens and prices move higher. The higher prices incentivize producers to invest in production capacity and increase output. Eventually, the market becomes oversupplied, prices fall, and the cycle starts all over again. Of […]

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